Argentina's Cristina Fernandez Calls for Unity Against Neoliberalism, Launches New Political Movement

Featured Argentina's Cristina Fernandez Calls for Unity Against Neoliberalism, Launches New Political Movement

The former President announced the new "Citizen's Unity" alliance that wil against the conservative government 

Former Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner launched Tuesday a new political alliance called Citizen's Unity that will put forward candidates to context seats in the country's upcoming legislative elections in the name of checking President Mauricio Macri's power in Congress.

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"I call for a citizen's unity, the unity of all Argentines," Fernandez said to a crowd of tens of thousands in Buenos Aires.

The politician criticized the rise in prices in basic services, incudluding gas and electricity, under the neoliberal agenda of the Macri administration.  

"We need to put a limit on this government in the next elections to stop this adjustment," Fernandez said. "With them we don't have a future, I don't think it's fair that we are suffering."

Social organizations and civil groups gathered at the packed stadium where the local Arsenal Football Club plays shouted, "We will return, we will return," a chorus made famous by her supporters. Some 30,000 people were expected to attend her announcement.

Fernandez, known in Argentina by her initials CFK, was expected to announce whether or not she will run for senator in Argentina's most populous province in the legislative elections scheduled for Oct. 22.

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"I come here to join as one more, to put my body, my head and my heart," Fernandez said. "To represent the interests of the men and women of flesh and bone."

The new alliance is made up of five political parties — New Gathering, Broad Front, Victory Party, Kolina and Federal Commitment — four of which were previously part of Fernandez' former political alliance, the Front for Victory. The Citizen's Unity coalition does not include Fernandez party with which she was elected president, the Justicialist Party, which is part of the Front for Victory. 

If Fernandez decides to run in this election, she could end up competing against her former Transportation Minister Florencio Randazzo, who has already announced his candidacy. Two sources close to her told Reuters she intends to run in Buenos Aires.

Rather than affiliating for the election with Peronism, the country's dominant progressive political movement, Fernandez and her allies' party aims to fight "the reinstatement of the neo-liberal model" under President Macri.

Candidates have until Saturday to confirm their plans to run in the legislative elections.

Last modified onTuesday, 20 June 2017 16:24

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