Luna Manzanares Ends in Cuba a Spectacular Adventure Tour

Featured Luna Manzanares Ends in Cuba a Spectacular Adventure Tour

Luna Manzanares lives a concert as an adventure and that pleasure, added to her powerful voice, make her one of the most versatile and spectacular singers of Cuba.

The young artist culminated her national tour yesterday with a concert at the Karl Marx Theater in this capital, which allowed her to shine vocally, to dance with ease and to perform, demonstrating that each song lyrics moves her.

She started the concert with Nada mejor, a work written by Descemer Bueno that rhythmically flirts with reggae and premiered two songs of her own authorship: Dos veleros and Rayo de luz, the latter co-written with Adrián Berazaín, who later shared with her the song Ya no es antes.

The duo dedicated to the homonymous film by Cuban filmmaker Lester Hamlet became one of the highest moments of the night due to the excellent coupling.

Of the authorship of Bueno, producer of her first phonogram, Manzanares also performed Solo tú, En tu voz, Habana and La fantasía.

In addition, she exhibited lyricism in Osmani Collado's Casualidad, and she splurged sensuality in a song to Ochún (deity of the Afro-Cuban religion), composed by her.

The pianist Jorge Luis Lagarza was a fundamental support throughout the show, as well as the choristers Katia Ribas and Annys Batista, and a group of dancers led by the choreographer Robermi Carreras.

The appointment won in quality with the string quartet Frasis, composed of Roxana Iglesias, Caridad González, Yosmara Castañeda and Isabel García; the trumpet player Lázaro Oviedo; the saxophonist Emir Santa Cruz; the electric bass of Ernesto Hermida; and the acoustic guitar of Nam Sam Fomg, among other musicians.

Manzanares recalled that in 2017 she recorded a classic of the traditional Cuban trova along with the diva of the Buena Vista Social Club, Omara Portuondo, who vocalized it years ago with her compatriot Ibrahim Ferrer.

For this reason, the young woman dedicated to Portuondo the interpretation of Silencio, a bolero of the Puerto Rican composer Rafael Hernández that she performed with ease.

As a thank you, she once again joined her voice to that of the singer-songwriter Israel Rojas to highlight Una mujer, a touching piece included in Sobreviviente, the most recent album of Buena Fe.

To the delight of dissimilar generations, the artist offered a medley of hits from the 1970s in English, and closed the concert with a song by Cuban Alain Pérez, Tengo una esperanza.

The evening will be counted among the numerous triumphs of a singer who knows how to perform on stage and modulate her voice in the genres she sets her mind on, with only one limit: herself.

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